Zara has joined the conversation on gender fluidity, releasing a new collection titled Ungendered.

It’s a line of basics that doesn’t conform to gender restrictions, covering T-shirts, jeans, sweatshirts and even some lounge-y Bermuda shorts. The campaign shows the pieces as worn by both female and male models.

Despite Zara's best intentions, there’s already been significant backlash. The consensus seems to be that this isn’t at all remarkable, and that without the inclusion of more ‘statement’ items, like a skirt, Ungendered is nothing but a glorified unisex range. 

The range also seems to focus exclusively on masculine styles, lacking any cuts or lines that are typically more feminine. Another gripe is that Ungendered is only featured under the 'Woman' tab on Zara's website.

We agree with the criticism to an extent. Yes, technically there isn’t anything all that controversial in the product offering. But maybe that’s the point. Maybe it proves the industry is already producing a portion of clothes not defined by gender.

Zara also seems to have gone about this fairly quietly, taking gender fluidity in the fashion industry from an ‘anomaly’ and making it the norm. 

We need to start somewhere and fashion giants introducing gender fluid lines – with as little fuss as a new range of skirts in a women’s collection – is definitely somewhere.

Good job, Zara. You can check out the line here.

zara.com

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