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Clothing the Gap’s Chief Creative Officer’s Christmas wishlist is all about locally-made and Black-owned brands

WORDS BY CAIT EMMA BURKE

Prioritising brands that align with her values.

For a year that has moved at the pace of a diseased snail (apologies for that visceral imagery), Christmas time is approaching unbelievably quickly. Aside from gorging ourselves on all manner of delicious food and drink and packing more reading into a few days than you have the entire year, the festive season means purchasing presents, and that’s not always a walk in the park.

If like me, you’re stuck on ideas when it comes to gift-giving this year, seeing what other people – particularly interesting, stylish people – have on their personal Christmas wishlists can provide some much-needed inspiration.

This (and the fact that I’m very nosy) is why I’ve asked a selection of Australian creatives to share what they’d like to find under their trees this year. For the fourth and final instalment, we hear from Sianna Catullo, a proud Narungga woman and the head of brand and marketing at Aboriginal-owned and led social enterprise and fashion label Clothing the Gap.

Supporting brands and creators whose values align with her own is of the utmost importance to Sianna, and this is reflected in her wishlist – there are some very excellent selections from local slow fashion brands and Black-owned brands. Enjoy.

Liandra Swim Interwoven Collection

 

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A post shared by L i a n d r a (@liandraswim)

Liandra Swim is always on my mind every summer! The reversible bikinis mean you get two bikinis for the price of one! Liandra Swim is a 100 per cent Aboriginal-owned brand, storytelling through her beautiful designs. My favourite thing about this brand is her BTS videos on her IG where she shares her home along the ocean in Milingimbi, NT and where she draws inspiration from.

Get it here.

Charles Lebrun Denim Jeans

 

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A post shared by Charles LeBrun (@charles__lebrun)

I’ve been eyeing this brand off for a while now. I love this Melbourne brand not only because their Instagram is the most aesthetically pleasing page ever, but they champion trans-seasonal fashion and challenge gender norms. Loose and baggy is my kinda style and I love everything on their page.

Get it here.

Krystal Deans Eyelet Apron Top

 

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I love this Victorian brand because they are minimalistic slow fashion making clothes to order. Their designs are timeless and created with consideration of its end-use and ability to test time. They use their platform to educate about slow fashion and the dangers and effects of fast fashion on society and the environment.

Get it here.

Reborn Tees by HoMie Reborn

 

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I may be biased, but HoMie is and will always be my favourite brand. Another social enterprise, reinvesting their profits into youth hardship and homelessness in Melbourne. Reborn launched early this year in the middle of COVID, and it’s recycled clothing. They collab with other brands and make one of a kind pieces. The best part is no one can get the same tee! It’s special.

Get it here.

Rachel Sarra 2021 Diary

 

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I’m a busy gal with a terrible memory. Diaries for me are a must! I like the old school way of writing things down and taking time with no social media distractions to plan out my day. Rachel does contemporary Aboriginal art throughout the design. She’s bold and bright and I love her style.

Get it here.

Minority and Co Pride Jumper

 

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Loved seeing this Aboriginal brand come to life and thrive this year! I am a minimalist and love her simple yet powerfully designed merch. Sparking conversations and questions to make a statement without saying anything. Her honesty and transparency through her social media makes me love and want to support the brand more.

Get it here.

Gammin Threads Protest Tee

 

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Aboriginal-owned brand Gammin Threads was born from a love of typography, language and blak pride. It consists of deadly chill wear and accessories for people who believe in living colourfully, paying respect and empowering women.

Get it here.

North Warlu Collection

 

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A post shared by N O R T H (@o_north_o)

North is a not-for-profit organisation, working closely with Aboriginal artists from the Northern parts of Australia. The Warlu collection worked with artists from Yuendumu and Nyrippi communities and shared their stories through their beautiful designs. I have a few items from their last collection. They are bold beautiful pieces and I can’t go anywhere without getting stopped. Conversation starters are what I’m passionate about. High-end Aboriginal fashion. I can still have conversation starters even when I’m dressing up!

Get it here.

Street X NAIDOC Shorts

 

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Street X is a Perth brand who teamed up with the Aboriginal students from Hale School and collaborated on a NAIDOC tee and shorts. 13 to 17-year-old boys designed this deadly merch – how cool is that! All proceeds of the range go to the Moorditj Noongar Community College in Middle Swan, connecting Aboriginal kids to their culture.

Get it here.

Kip & Co Bábbarra Collection

 

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Beautiful bedding and cosmetic purses. Aboriginal designed. What’s special about this collab is the business to business relationship. Kip & Co didn’t only just purchase the Aboriginal design and profit from it themselves (like a lot of brands unfortunately do). 50 per cent of profits from this collection is shared with the Babbarra Women’s Centre.

Get it here.

@siannacatullo

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